MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Merry Christmas!  Just as a heads up, I’m starting to move things over to http://lisasanuma.wordpress.com Yes, that was my Christmas present to me.  Starting over with a grown-up blog (and twitter account!) that actually reflect my name.  About time!

For YOU, I hope you have a wonderful Christmas. I know I will. Be safe out there, folks!

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First Christmas-itis…

It’s December 23rd, and like most years, I’m a little nervous, and running a little late.  See, I like to make my Christmas presents—usually a necessity, considering I don’t have a lot of money and usually have a lot of yarn.  Or at least, yarn.  The problem with this is that I never start early enough, and I invariably forget someone extremely important to me.  I swear sometimes there are holes in my brain.  I’m sadly very, very good at missing the obvious sometimes.

So here I am, two days before Christmas… none of my Christmas cards are sent out, none of my gifties are done, and a couple of them are not yet even started. Gifts for my family also have not been sent. They’re sitting around the room, wrapped, but still definitely here in my apartment in Utah, rather than flying to their various locations elsewhere.

I don’t even have the gift I’m knitting for my husband done yet, and this stresses me out like none other.  Especially as I was particularly meaning for this to be a good Christmas for him, since it’s probably his first real Christmas in years, and he’s so very excited for it. (I am too, don’t get me wrong!)

So, excuse me if I run out of here and go work like mad to finish my presents up. I’m afraid that’s about all I’m going to get accomplished today, other than probably catching up on Vampire Diaries, because hey, at least I can do that while I knit.

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Emulating the Greats—plans for 2011

There’s a quote from Anne’s House of Dreams that has amused me since I read it.

The trouble with Mr. Howard is that he’s a leetle TOO clever. He thinks that he’s bound to live up to his cleverness, and that it’s smarter to thrash out some new way of getting to heaven than to go by the old track the common, ignorant folks is travelling.

This can be applied to the publishing world, too, I think.  There are some people out there (I know, because I’ve run into a few of them) who think that the book they’re writing is so clever, so ingenius, so new, that agents and publishers will fall at their feet with offers and contracts the moment it’s revealed.  There may be tips and tricks to learn how to write better and how to self-promote, etc, but they don’t need these things, because they’re already inalienably brilliant, and their brilliancy shines from the very first sentence of their very first query letter, etc.

I am not, nor ever have been of that school of thought.  Well, no, I lie… maybe I was when I first started writing at the age of twelve, but a friend glancing over my work and reading the first paragraph or two aloud to my intense mortification proved me otherwise.  For me, the mantra has always been learn as much as you can—read the best books, and now that it’s available, the best author blogs that you can.  Find out what they did, how they think, and what the publishing world has taught them, etc.

And okay, part of this is because I’m a fangirl. What? I am.  So when I find an author I’m intolerably excited about (like Maggie Stiefvater, for example) I go looking up their blogs and things.  In Maggie’s case, I stumbled on The Merry Sisters of Fate, a blog where she and Brenna Yavanoff and Tessa Gratton each write a short story a month, offering them up as free reads.  Maggie told me herself how much this has helped them all in their writing, and just recently posted on how going through the “complete process” of writing a story as often as possible has taught her so much.

I have to admit, free reads are something I’ve been interested in for a long time.  My dear Wren & Marnie were an experiment between free read and blog fiction, which sadly combusted in my face, and I’ve offered a short retelling of Rapunzel, with the intention of making it more of a habit, but always failing to do so.  I think, though, that this has been because there has never been a deadline, or a concrete goal in mind.  So now, I have one.  Well, maybe I should say we.

Starting in January, Isabelle Santiago and I are going to be posting weekly fiction at Tales From the Hollow Tree.  That means two stories by each of us each and every month.  This is going to be a big challenge for us, but something we’re really set on doing.  It will mean stretching out of our comfort zones in a lot of ways, but we’re going to have fun and play with short fiction as much as we can, and we’re very likely to be including alternate POVs or teasers from our WIPs (of course!)

I’m really, really excited about this, and so is Isabelle.  I just hope the Merry Sisters of Fate don’t hold it against us.  After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, right?  Right?

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Reading as a Profession.

Girl reading by Charles Edward Perugini

Girl reading by Charles Edward Perugini

Like most avid readers, I’ve had a dream since I was young to be able to read for a living.  Of course, anyone who really does read for a living knows it doesn’t quite look like the fantasy—which is lying around on a comfy chaise of some sort in the middle of a vast library of leather-bound books (or hot bestsellers, take your pick).  What it generally looks like, especially in today’s climate, is sitting in front of your computer a lot and skimming word files, and unless you’re lucky enough to be a book reviewer, those word files are probably only submissions, meaning that the quality of the work is not guaranteed.

I’ve known this for a while now.  In college I edited on a poetry magazine called Into the Teeth of the Wind.  The magazine is known for having a quirky, transitive sort of audience, so the poetry that came in to us really ranged from brilliant to outright drivel (or outright weird).  In fact, if anything has taught me to appreciate conciseness and good poetry, it would have to be the masses of extremely poor poetry that I read in my four years of college.  Reading bad poetry (along with some very good poetry, of course) really turned me into a better poet myself.

Reading submissions for other things is no more likely to mean particularly good reads.  Submissions for an online publishing house (or any publishing house, I would imagine) are just as likely to attract questionable writing as a small print-run college lit mag.  Does this mean reading a LOT of bad starts? Yes… it certainly does, but it also makes you appreciate the writing that is good, where the author has clearly honed their craft and done all they can to make the story the best it can be.  This is a great learning experience for me, too… because just as reading a lot of bad poetry made me a better poet, reading questionable writing can make me a better writer, because I can see in other people’s work the mistakes I might be making myself, and that’s a golden lesson if ever there was one.

So, reading as a profession isn’t quite the fantasy that it was for me as a kid… but as I’m starting out in this new journey, it’s certainly a fun and exciting thing for me.

Not that I plan on giving up on the massive TBR list I have stacked up, of course… To share a quote by a brilliant man…

“Read for pleasure. Never forget to read for pleasure.” – W.S. Merwin

~Lisa, who can’t wait until she’s a professional author and can write book purchases off of her taxes.  What?  You know that’s a sizable perk…

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Dear Emily…

I was going to write on a Christmas-y subject today, but I ran across something that reminded me of an Emily Dickinson poem, and now all I can think of is Dickinson, Dickinson, Dickinson, so that other post will have to wait.

The “something” I ran across was this fabulous quote by Willa Cather, arguably another extremely important woman in the wide scope of American literature, but someone I know considerably less about, and have never personally read:

The fact that I was a girl never damaged my ambitions to be a pope or an emperor.

My mind jumped immediately to what is possibly my favorite Emily Dickinson poem:

No matter — now — Sweet —
But when I’m Earl —
Won’t you wish you’d spoken
To that dull Girl?

Trivial a Word — just —
Trivial — a Smile —
But won’t you wish you’d spared one
When I’m Earl?

I shan’t need it — then —
Crests — will do —
Eagles on my Buckles —
On my Belt — too —

Ermine — my familiar Gown —
Say — Sweet — then
Won’t you wish you’d smiled — just —
Me upon?

— Emily Dickinson – # 704

So, in case you didn’t know this… in case you had the mistaken idea that Emily Dickinson was this depressed, lonely girl who did nothing but dress in white and lock herself up and hide away from the world… read that poem again.  Emily Dickinson was a rock star.  Her imagination had NO limitations, and she was pretty much one of the smartest people who ever lived. (It’s true… if you don’t understand one of her poems, go back and look EVERY word up in the dictionary, then you’ll want to cry because you’ll see how smart she is.)  She was also, obviously, not afraid of female empowerment, and writing freely about it.  Not that all of her poems are about her… that’s something you definitely don’t want to assume, especially when she writes about remembering being a young boy, etc. ;)

Okay, I know I fangirl weird things.  I do.  Emily Dickinson is NOT a normal thing for someone to fangirl.  A professor of mine my very first semester of college nipped me with the Dickinson Love bug, though, and there’s no coming back from that.

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This is my blogging face.

I think I’m going to take up the habit of early-morning blogging.  You must understand, I am far from an early-morning kind of person.  I’m more of a write-until-the-middle-of-the-night-when-you-have-no-choice-but-to-pass-out person, and that was all well and good when I was single, but I’m starting to understand that that gets in the way of Married Life.  (Or vice-versa, but bygones).

Meanwhile, one of the things Married Life entails is making sure Husband gets up in the morning, and making a lunch for him, because prior knowledge proves that he’ll simply go without eating otherwise, and considering he works unfortunately long hours some days, that’s not something I’m willing to let happen.

This means I’m starting to make the slow transition from Night Owl to Morning Person.  Or at least, Able-To-Wake-Up-In-The-Morning-And-Accomplish-Things Person.  This is not a first for me.  I took an LDS Seminary class that started at 6:00 when I was in high school, which I was fairly (excuse the pun) religious about attending, so I am at least familiar with the concept that the sun actually rises, and doesn’t just appear in the sky and slowly set every day.

Still, as various parental figures in my life would tell you, morning has never really been my strong suit.  In fact, most of my early-morning romps of late have ended up with me falling asleep around nine or eleven anyhow, which is slightly pathetic, but at least for the moment still true.  What? I’m an eight-hours-of-sleep kinda girl, and that’s hard to do when you go to bed at midnight and wake up at five.

I’m planning on using quiet early morning time for other things that I’ve been neglecting of late, too… like reading, for instance. And the actual Writing writing that I’m supposed to be doing.  Isabelle Santiago and I are going to really challenge ourselves and each other to get some things done by March (March?).  In my case, I plan on having a first draft finished—finally finally finished—of my YA Paranormal.

Now excuse me, I have jobs in Japan to apply to.

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2010 Year in Review

Apparently nothing grinds a blog (or writing in general, in fact) to a halt like planning and organizing a wedding.  I got married November 9th (hip hip hooray!) and am only just starting to get my routine back into place.  I’d like to say “back to normal,” but my husband and I are actually planning on going to Japan for a year… if I can find a teaching job there, that is.  Here’s hoping!

This year has been a tumultuous one, to say the least, but also one of the most eventful. Got engaged, got married, etc, etc…  the year is a bit of a blur, really, but it seems to have lasted a long time, too.  I’m just a bundle of clichés when I try to talk about it.  Suffice it to say that it’s been a good year, and I’m happy with how everything turned out.  Did I expect to be here a year ago today?  Not hardly… but when life happens, you can either let it, or hide from it, and I’m starting to think that giving in and not hiding from it anymore was a big part of my growing up this year.

As to other things… I’ve done pitifully at my 52 books challenge.  I have finished exactly a dozen books so far this year.  I have fairly good chances of finishing Anne of Ingleside before the year peters out, but that’s still a good 39 books short of my goal, and 40 less than last year.  I’ve been feeling the absence in my life, too.

The plan is to start online presences off a little fresh in 2011.  Tales From the Hollow Tree will be completely revamped, with a couple of extra staff members coming on board.  CinderLisaDesign, my alter ego, will finally be getting back to regular updates, too.  I’ll even be getting back to my tumblr, where I’m most likely to talk about any and all of the above in one place.

As to other plans… as I said, Japan.  Sadly I’ve missed a lot of deadlines, but I’ve worked up a CV, and I’m going to start sending it out as soon as possible.  It may be a bit insane, but we’re broke as broke right now anyhow, and when will we be able to do it in the future?  After we have kids and start a family? Not likely.  So we’re destination Japan. Wish us luck.

 

(I realize I’ve gone from writing “me” to “us”… I don’t know that this blog will stay that involved in my married life—not likely—but still… apologies, if  it’s thrown you off!)

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